Stopping Crossrail and London's centralised growth

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On Thursday 20 Sept the government was reported as making yet another attempt to get private interests, especially those which stand to profit most, to contribute heavily to Crossrail – as a condition for government funding.

They published this letter from me next day and we’ll see whether it generates any flow of further stuff, either on crossrail or on what kind of growth London needs…


On Thursday 20 Sept the government was reported as making yet another attempt to get private interests, especially those which stand to profit most, to contribute heavily to Crossrail – as a condition for government funding. Evening Standard Thursday article by Joe Murphy here

They published this letter from me next day and we’ll see whether it generates any flow of further stuff, either on crossrail or on what kind of growth London needs…

If you have time and inclination to join in this campaign then DO. Read the evening standard to see what’s happening and send your letters to joshua.neicho@standard.co.uk or correspond with me at m.edwards@ucl.ac.uk (The “comment” facility on this blog is switched off because of spam.)

London needs massive transport investment if employment growth in the City
and Canary Wharf is to continue on its trajectory. But there is an
alternative, which could avoid the need for Crossrail and other costly
schemes.

Many organisations representing Londoners and environmental interests now
consider London can’t afford to keep growing on the same old terms –
subordinating everything to central London business growth and depending on
ever more commuters from far-flung locations. This summer’s floods were
another wake-up call for radical thinking about where we live and work.
We should explore ways to achieve maximum well-being, not maximum GDP,
which would mean lowering the pressure of demand for housing, diverting
employment growth to areas near people’s homes and switching some
investment to improving transport capacity between suburbs.
Earlier this year, a dozen London NGOs tried to persuade the public inquiry
on the latest London Plan revisions that we should debate this issue – but
the Mayor’s office apparently would not hear of it. Perhaps Londoners could
give their views about how much growth is needed and on what terms.

Michael Edwards, University College London.

*********************end********************
Michael Edwards, The Bartlett School, UCL
22 Gordon Street
London WC1H 0QB

Author: Ed

Editor

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